Volume 1, Issue 4, November 2016, Page: 155-161
Estimating Willingness to Pay for Labeobarbus Fish Species Conservation in Lake Tana, Ethiopia: A Contingent Valuation Study
Berhan Asmamaw, Aquatic Animals Biodiversity Case Team, Animal Biodiversity Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Birhanu Beyene, Aquatic Animals Biodiversity Case Team, Animal Biodiversity Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Misikire Tessema, Aquatic Animals Biodiversity Case Team, Animal Biodiversity Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Afework Kara, Aquatic Animals Biodiversity Case Team, Animal Biodiversity Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Biniam Goshu, Genetic Resources Access and Benefit Sharing Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Abraham Assefa, Aquatic Animals Biodiversity Case Team, Animal Biodiversity Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Received: Aug. 16, 2016;       Accepted: Aug. 24, 2016;       Published: Sep. 10, 2016
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijnrem.20160104.12      View  2749      Downloads  121
Abstract
This study employed Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) to assess the willingness to pay (WTP) by labor of beneficiaries of lake Tana, Ethiopia for the conservation activities of labeobarbus fish species. The WTP was conducted among 357 beneficiaries of the lake in 11 kebeles (districts). The data revealed that 96.9% of the respondents are willing to pay for the conservation activities of labeobarbus fish species by labor work. The mean WTP in working days is estimated at 48.48 labor days per year per household in the four weredas/districts studied, which is equivalent to 4,422,792.4 USD per year. Respondents WTP is significantly influenced by age, sex, economic activity respondents involved in, and the level of understanding of the respondents about future generation without labeobarbus fish species. A full scale campaign on education and environmental conservation activities will help improving the attitudes of the respondents, and if programs can be designed and implemented accordingly, it will help to alleviate the problem of loss (decreasing number) of labeobarbus species flock in lake Tana.
Keywords
Willingness to Pay, Contingent Valuation Methods, Labeobarbus
To cite this article
Berhan Asmamaw, Birhanu Beyene, Misikire Tessema, Afework Kara, Biniam Goshu, Abraham Assefa, Estimating Willingness to Pay for Labeobarbus Fish Species Conservation in Lake Tana, Ethiopia: A Contingent Valuation Study, International Journal of Natural Resource Ecology and Management. Vol. 1, No. 4, 2016, pp. 155-161. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnrem.20160104.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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