Volume 3, Issue 4, July 2018, Page: 58-65
Strengthening Conservation of Owl- Faced Monkeys (Cercopithecus Hamlyni) in the Albertine Rift Region (ARR)
Wycliffe Tumwesigye, Department of Economics and Environmental Management, Bishop Stuart University, Mbarara, Uganda
Louis Rugerinyange, Nyungwe National Park, Rwanda Development Board, Kigali, Rwanda
Claude Hakizimana, Kibira National Park, National Institute for Conservation of Nature and Environment, Bujumbura, Burundi
Doreen Atwongyeire, Department of Economics and Environmental Management, Bishop Stuart University, Mbarara, Uganda
Goretty Nagawa, Department of Economics and Environmental Management, Bishop Stuart University, Mbarara, Uganda
Daniel Ndizihiwe, Department of Agriculture and Agribusiness, Bishop Stuart University, Mbarara, Uganda
Received: Aug. 7, 2018;       Accepted: Sep. 13, 2018;       Published: Oct. 15, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijnrem.20180304.13      View  213      Downloads  10
Abstract
The owl-faced monkeys (Cercopithecus hamlyni) are endemic to the Albertine Rift Region (ARR). They live in and feed on bamboo plantations as their primary habitat. Illegal bamboo harvesting threaten the owl-faced monkeys and associated biodiversity across the Nyungwe-Kibira trans-boundary ecosystem in the ARR. Spatial distribution of bamboo plantations, mechanisms for propagation and management in Rwanda and Burundi are poorly documented. The study aimed at mapping potential Cecopithecus hamlyni habitats, establishment of threats facing bamboo plantations, and training local communities in bamboo propagation and management techniques. The study used GIS data from IUCN red list and diva-gis websites, 300 household interviews and focus group discussions of key informants from Rwanda and Burundi. GIS 10, SPSS version 18 and Microsoft Excel were used for data analysis. Results indicate that potential habitats for C. hamlyni include: Western DR Congo, South Eastern Rwanda and North Western Burundi. Results show that 67% of the households harvest bamboo trees for handcrafts and construction while 50% harvest bamboo trees for sale due to high poverty levels in their households. The study concluded that collaborative trans-boundary management of protected areas, capacity building for local communities, formation of cooperatives and enacting appropriate laws promotes biodiversity conservation in the region. Strengthening law enforcement and propagation of bamboo plantations on marginal land were recommended.
Keywords
Bamboo Habitat, Cercopithecus Hamlyni, Biodiversity, Conservation, Trans-Boundary Ecosystem
To cite this article
Wycliffe Tumwesigye, Louis Rugerinyange, Claude Hakizimana, Doreen Atwongyeire, Goretty Nagawa, Daniel Ndizihiwe, Strengthening Conservation of Owl- Faced Monkeys (Cercopithecus Hamlyni) in the Albertine Rift Region (ARR), International Journal of Natural Resource Ecology and Management. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2018, pp. 58-65. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnrem.20180304.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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